Categories
Video Work

NASPA Speaker Video

I was approached by a colleague in our suite to help with a video presentation for the annual NASPA conference (for college-level advisors). Each year, advisors attending the conference who want to apply for a speaking role must submit a YouTube video in order to essentially compete for an opening.

If you know anything about me now, I don’t take opportunities for creativity to shine lightly. Within three hours, I had taken her script, recorded the monologue in her office with her voice, drafted an outline, and used our resident DSLR (the Nikon D90) to shoot tons of B-roll and fancy DOF shots to layer behind her voice. I pulled down a simple ethereal track from free sound.org and presented her with a finished video by the end of the day.

It was my first experience with shooting DSLR video; it never ceases to amaze me how effective constraints are at producing work quickly and effectively.

The video was shot entirely with a Nikon D90 and edited in Premiere Pro.

Categories
Video Work

Time Management Orientation Short

At UCF Orientation, the office of First Year Advising and Exploration (FYAE) displays a short presentation about time management and suggested techniques for students. My team was asked to assist in ripping a DVD to retrieve footage (it had been recorded right on the DVD); after discovering it had been burned using a proprietary technique, I suggested simply re-shooting the video with our Viera camcorder. Being the enthusiast videographer that I am, I asked permission to direct and edit the production to completion.

The completed video is displayed above and was edited entirely in Premiere Pro.

Categories
Video Work

SDES IT: Training Video Series Introduction

Once the SDES IT Training site idea took off, I was asked to develop an introduction to play before each video series; I was told to “think of it as branding,” but because the video clips were hidden from the public, I sprinkled in a bit of creativity to bring something to the typical, non-technical, and often overly-comfortable end-user that they wouldn’t expect, in the hopes of waking them up and making them think. It was eventually widdled down to an ineffectual, five-second clip.

The (original) introduction above was shot entirely on UCF campus and edited in Premiere Pro, with compositing effects done in After Effects.

Categories
Personal Video Work

Enginehead: DJ Dr. Thunder (April Fools Video)

One day at the Sentinel, I pitched an idea for a joke video about my busted, old Civic for an April Fools joke. One weekend I took home one of the Canon’s and shot a bunch of ridiculous footage of me in aviators acting like a caricature of the typical interviewee in our weekly videos. I followed the workflow as closely as I could, creating a photo gallery, a video, a fact sheet, and a billboard image. Our marketing team got an ad buy from Honda to correspond with the video post, and we launched the video on April 1, 2008.

The video was shot with a Canon GL1 and captured and edited in Premiere Pro. Graphics within the video were created in Illustrator and Photoshop.

Categories
Video Work

Enginehead: Video Intro Slate

Our introduction slate for all Enginehead.com videos was pretty outdated, so I offered to do a new one with newer footage from our videos. This was the result! Pretty happy with it. Video arranged and edited in Premiere.

Categories
Video Work

Orlando Sentinel: Enginehead Interview Videos

As part of my position at the Orlando Sentinel’s interactive group, I was tasked with creating a weekly interview-style montage video of a local car enthusiast and his pride and joy. In most cases, I was responsible for: recording the footage of the car, B-roll of the car driving, and the interview; micing the interviewer and capturing the audio; photographing the car and the individual for a photo gallery to accompany the video; identify the 10-15 best photos, edit them, and post them to the Orlando Sentinel’s CMS; and capture the audio and video, edit it together on an Avid or Final Cut machine, and post the video to the CMS.

I have many examples of this work: here are some links to the above-mentioned material.

All video was edited in Avid, Final Cut Pro, or Premiere Pro. All photos were edited in Photoshop.